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Autumn Kale Salad

11 Nov

I’ve been making a version of this salad a lot over the past few weeks because of the abundance of kale at the farmers’ market and thus in my fridge. It’s super quick to make and because kale is so hearty, it lasts for up to 4 days. Experiment with different greens, dried fruits and ingredients in general! I like to make a large mason jar of vinaigrette and have it in the fridge to use at any time.

Autumn Kale Salad

2 cups raw kale, finely chopped
2 small heritage carrots, finely sliced
1/2 small red pepper, finely sliced
1/2 a large parsnip, shredded
1/4 white or red onion, finely sliced
2 dried nectarine halves, finely slice (or any other dried fruit)

Dressing:
1/4 olive oil
2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1 Tbsp dried herbs (basil, thyme, oregano, rosemary)
1/4 tsp mustard powder
1 tsp onion granules
1 tsp garlic granules
1 tsp sugar

Toss everything in a bowl with dressing and let sit for about 2 hours. Kale will start to soften. Portion out individually and store for up to 4 days.

Enjoy!
Jacinthe

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I made bread – you can too!!

26 Oct

Ok, so. Those of you who know me know that I’ve been wanting – nay, yearning – to learn how to make bread. My relationship with yeast has been tepid, at best. I’m not talking about tepid as in the lukewarm water you’re supposed to use to activate the yeast. I mean every time I’ve ever tried using yeast, I’ve somehow killed it (the time I thought I was supposed to use 100 degree CELSIUS water, not 100 degree FAHRENHEIT – whoops), or it’s only partially risen (not enough rising time??), or it’s risen and then baked into a brick (no idea)!

I got The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Easy Artisan Bread from the library, without even knowing it was a collection of no-knead bread recipes. I’ve seen Michael Smith’s Chef at Home episode where he makes no-knead bread as per the technique developed by Jim Lahey and outlined in the New York Times piece by Mark Bittman. So I thought, how hard can it be? It’ll perfect for my computer weary arms.

The first try I did everything the book told me, including mixing the yeast in with the dry ingredients and then adding the liquid. Two hours of rising time went by and…nothing happened. My hopes dashed, I asked around and was told that I had to activate the yeast (I totally knew that…but I was following the book directions!)

Anyway, I made the recipe again, with already activated yeast, and viola – bread was made. Calgary is SUPER dry, so I ended up adding a full 1/2 to 1 cup more water than the recipe called for.

Classic French Boule – from The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Easy Artisan Bread

3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 1/4 tsp instant or rapid rise yeast
1 1/4 – 2 1/4 cups lukewarm water (I activated the yeast in about 1/4 cup lukewarm water with 1 tsp sugar)
2 tbsp cornmeal

Stir everything but the cornmeal together in a large bowl, until it comes into a ball. Loosely cover with plastic wrap (and a damp tea towel) and let rise on the counter in a draft-free place for 2-3 hours. Place in the fridge and let sit overnight up to 48 hours.

Preheat a Dutch Oven (enameled pot) in a 425 F oven for 45 minutes. With floured hands on a well-floured surface, draw the dough together into a 6″ ball. Let rise, seam side up in a bowl (covered again with plastic wrap or a damp, floured towel) for 30 minutes – 1 hour.

Once the Dutch Oven is heated, sprinkle the cornmeal on the bottom and turn the dough into it (seam side down). Cover it and bake for 30 minutes. Remove lid and bake for 20 minutes more or until an internal temperature of 210 F is reached.

Transfer to a cooling rack and let cool completely.

Enjoy!

Baked Crabapples with Onion and Sage

14 Oct

Here’s the latest article from the Bodhi Tree’s October 2011 newsletter.

—–

Many times in yoga class we are asked to set an intention for our practice. It could be anything from courage or strength, to softness or vulnerability. Setting an intention helps us move from just making shapes with our bodies to watching what comes up during our practice and working with the energy in our subtle bodies to deepen our understanding of ourselves.

Recently as I’ve come to my mat, I’ve found that “love” is the intention that pops into my head first. Sending love out into your everyday life not only benefits you, but also strengthens your relationships with the people around you and the earth. You might recall a time when “love” was the intention for your asana practice as well. That day, maybe you left that love intention on the mat, carried a little into the next activity you did, or perhaps you made love your highest purpose in life!

You can express love for yourself and for others in many ways: smiling at a stranger on the sidewalk, sending a note to a dear friend out-of-the-blue, expressing gratitude, or doing something by yourself just for the fun of it. Another great way to share this intention is through food. Cooking for those you love, bringing baked goods to friends or coworkers, is enough to let anyone know that they are loved!

Crabapples are ripe all over the city, just waiting to be used in this month’s recipe. Try it for upcoming holiday meals, because food made with love always tastes better! Continue reading

How-To: Basil Pesto (with cashews and lemon)

11 Oct

Basil is probably the most classic pesto ingredient you can come by. Earlier this Summer, I was planning the menu for my second camping trip of the season and debating whether I should buy prepared pesto or make my own.

You see, on a previous camping trip, my friend and I had discovered that sautéing kale, swiss chard, broccoli, beet greens or any other of our favourite greens was super delicious and quick. Pesto turned out to be an excellent and versatile ingredient to include in the cooler.

I was short on time and thought, “Oh, I’ll just buy some.” Off to the farmers’ market I went, but instead of buying a 125 ml jar for $7, I walked away with $15 worth of basil (about 1/3 of a clear garbage bag full). Needless to say, I made a lot of pesto for much less than I would’ve bought it for! Continue reading

Edamame, Arame and Sweet Potato Salad

27 Sep

I made this delicious salad for the most recent Monday Night Supper Club – potluck edition. It’s another fast, easy recipe (my favourite kind) that always impresses.


Edamame, Arame and Sweet Potato Salad:

1 cup arame, soaked for 30 minutes and rinsed
2 cups sweet potato, cut into 1/2″ cubes and steamed
1 cup edamame, boiled in salted water for 3 minutes
1 green onion, sliced on the bias
2″ daikon radish, grated
1 Tbsp sesame seeds, toasted

Dressing:
2 Tbsps sesame oil
2 Tbsps tamari
5 Tbsps rice wine vinegar
2 Tbsps ginger, freshly grated
3 Tbsps maple syrup
Pinch of cinnamon or five-spice powder


Directions:
Prepare the dressing in a measuring cup or jar. Mix or shake well.

Drain Arame (seaweed) in a colander and squeeze out extra water. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and let sit for at least 1 hour, for all the flavours to incorporate.

Can be refrigerated for up to 5 days.

Enjoy!
Jacinthe

Garden Salad with Edible Flowers

16 Aug

A great event takes place every Monday called Monday Night Super Club. Headed up by Dan Clapson and mostly organized via Twitter (#MNSCyyc), it was born after the latest season of Top Chef Canada finished, ending the weekly Monday night viewings a group of foodies had been attending at Charcut (Connie De Sousa, executive chef at Charcut, made it to the top 3).

The club alternates going to a Calgary restaurant one week then having a potluck the next week. Last Monday’s MNSC – my first supper – was held at Anju Restaurant. It was AH-MAZING! Here’s Dan’s recap of the evening. This week being potluck week, everyone brought something and we met up at Sandy Beach. Continue reading

How to Roast a Pepper

7 Jun

Roasting peppers is super simple with super sweet and flavourful results. Once you know how, you can make them all the time to use in anything from hummus to soup and pasta salad to paninis! Continue reading

Try a new ingredient — Thai Salad Rolls

2 Jun

Here’s the original article in the Bodhi Tree’s June 2011 Newsletter.

———-

T.K.V. Desikachar wrote in The Heart of Yoga that “the proper practice of asanas requires our mind to be fully focused; this is automatically achieved by arousing interest and attentiveness through new experiences.”

Taking Desikachar’s words into consideration, do something to spice up your everyday routine: go to a movie alone; sign-up for a Meet-Up group dedicated to a subject you’re interested in; or volunteer with a charity you’ve been meaning to get involved with. In your yoga practice, try a class you haven’t been to before, do a practice at home, or go for a pose you’ve shied away from in the past. You may be surprised at what interest gets stirred up inside of you.

This month seek out recipes that use ingredients you’ve never tried before. Start small by substituting the flour in your favourite muffins with amaranth or spelt flour, or try this month’s recipe, Thai Salad Rolls, which has one or two ingredients that are out-of-the-ordinary. Don’t worry if they aren’t perfect in the beginning; rice paper is finicky to work with. You can add peppers, avocado or other vegetables as well. No matter the results, they’ll taste delicious and you’ll learn something new. Continue reading

Root Vegetable Slaw

26 Apr

Here’s the original article from the Bodhi Tree’s March 2011 newsletter.

———–

Come, come, whoever you are.
Wanderer, worshiper, lover of leaving — it doesn’t matter,
Ours is not a caravan of despair.
Come, even if you have broken your vow a hundred times,
Come, come again, come.
~ Rumi

This yo-yo Calgary Winter can have an effect on our moods, often sending us soaring when warm winds spill over the mountains and the sun basks us in his rays, only to draw us down when the brisk air whips across the city, covering us once again in layers of snow. Many of us are ready for some consistent sunshine and the smell of Spring. Continue reading